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Intelligent Sensor Design Using the Microchip dsPIC US$69.95

ELV9780750677554
Intelligent Sensor Design Using the Microchip dsPIC

Intelligent Sensor Design Using the Microchip dsPIC Highlights

Intelligent sensors are revolutionizing the world of system design in everything from sports cars to assembly lines. These new sensors have abilities that leave their predecessors in the dust! They not only measure parameters efficiently and precisely, but they also have the ability to enhance and interrupt those measurements, thereby transforming raw data into truly useful information

Unlike many embedded systems books that confine themselves strictly to firmware and software, this book also delves into the supporting electronic hardware, providing the reader with a complete understanding of the issues involved when interfacing to specific types of sensor and offering insight into the real-world problems designers will face. Meaningful software examples are implemented in both C and assembly language, and the source code is included on the accompanying CD. The examples provide a complete, easily extensible code framework for sensor-based applications as well as basic support routines that are often ignored or treated superficially. The goal throughout is to make readers truly productive as quickly as possible while providing the thorough understanding necessary to design robust systems.

Readers will gain in-depth, real-world design information that will help them be more productive and get up to speed on sensor design skills more quickly. The book provides designers and students a leg up in a relatively new design area, imparting knowledge about a new microcontroller that offers some of the functionality of a DSP chip.

Intelligent Sensor Design Using the Microchip dsPIC Book Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Author: Creed Huddleston
  • Publisher: Newnes; Pap/Cdr edition (December 11, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 7.4 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds

Intelligent Sensor Design Using the Microchip dsPIC Table of Contents

1. What are Intelligent Sensors, and Why Should I Care about Them?

  • 1.1 Conventional Sensors Aren't Perfect
  • 1.2 First Things First—Digitizing the Sensor Signal
  • 1.3 Next Step—Add Some Intelligence
  • 1.4 Finish up with Quick and Reliable Communications
  • 1.5 Put It All Together, and You've Got an Intelligent Sensor
  • 1.6 Why Don't We Make Everything Intelligent?
  • 1.6.1 Development and Production Costs Exceed Customer-Valued Benefits
  • 1.6.2 Lack of Necessary Infrastructure
  • 1.6.3 Environmental Conditions Preclude Additional Electronic Circuitry
1.7 Real-World Examples of Intelligent Sensors
  • 1.7.1 Multichannel Digital Temperature Sensor
  • 1.7.2 Flow Sensors
  • 1.7.3 Steer-by-Wire Steering-Position Sensor
1.8 Outline of the Remainder of the Book
  • 1.8.1 Endnotes

2. Intuitive Digital Signal Processing

  • 2.1 Foundational Concepts for Signal Processing
  • 2.1.1 Getting Specific-What We Mean by Signals and Noise
  • 2.1.2 Viewing Signals in the Frequency Domain
  • 2.1.3 Cleaning up the Signal-Introducing Filters
  • 2.1.3.1 Sampling the Analog Signal
  • 2.1.3.2 Low-Pass Filters
  • 2.1.3.3 High-Pass Filters
  • 2.1.3.4 Bandpass Filters
  • 2.1.3.5 Bandstop Filters
  • 2.1.3.6 Digital Filter Implementations
  • 2.1.3.7 Median Filters
2.2 Issues Related to Signal Sampling
  • 2.2.1 The Effect of Digitization on the Sampled Signal
  • 2.2.2 Finite Register Length Effects
  • 2.2.3 Oversampling
  • 2.3 How to Analyze a Sensor Signal Application
2.4 A General Sensor Signal-Processing Framework
  • 2.4.1 Signal Conditioning and Acquisition
  • 2.4.2 Pre-Analysis Filtering
  • 2.4.3 Signal Linearization
  • 2.4.4 Parameter Analysis
  • 2.4.5 Post-Analysis Filtering
  • 2.4.6 Error Detection and Handling
  • 2.4.7 Communication
2.5 Summary
    2.5.1 Endnotes

3. Underneath the Hood of the dsPIC DSC

  • 3.1 The dsPIC DSC's Data Processing Architecture
  • 3.1.1 The dsPIC DSC Memory
  • 3.1.1.1 Data Space Memory Map
  • 3.1.1.1.1 Special Function Registers
  • 3.1.1.1.2 Static RAM (SRAM)
  • 3.1.1.1.3 Program Space Memory Mapped As Data Space Memory
  • 3.1.1.2 Program Space Memory Map
  • 3.1.2 The DSP Engine
  • 3.1.2.1 Numeric Data Representation
  • 3.1.2.2 Hardware Multiplier
  • 3.1.2.3 Dual 40-Bit Accumulators
  • 3.1.2.4 40-Bit Barrel Shifter
  • 3.1.3 Addressing Modes and the Address Generation Units
3.2 Interrupt Structure
  • 3.2.1 Shadow Registers
  • 3.3 The On-Chip Peripherals
  • 3.3.1 Data Acquisition Peripherals
  • 3.3.1.1 Analog-to-Digital Converters
  • 3.3.1.1.1 Step 1 – Signal Path Configuration
  • 3.3.1.1.2 Step 1A – Configuring the I/O Port Pins
  • 3.3.1.1.3 Step 1B – Selecting the Reference Voltage Sources
  • 3.3.1.1.4 Step 1C – Selecting the Analog Inputs to Digitize
  • 3.3.1.1.5 Step 1D – Specifying the ADC Conversion Clock
  • 3.3.1.1.6 Step 1E – Selecting the Sampling and Conversion Triggers
  • 3.3.1.1.7 Checklist for Using the ADC Module
3.3.2 Timer/Counter Module
  • 3.3.2.1 Common Timer/Counter Features
3.3.2.2 Type A Timer/Counters
  • 3.3.2.2.1 Timer Mode Initialization
  • 3.3.2.2.2 Synchronous Counter Mode Initialization
  • 3.3.2.2.3 Asynchronous Counter Mode
3.3.2.3 Type B Timer/Counters
  • 3.3.2.3.1 16-Bit Timer and 16-Bit Synchronous Counter Initialization
  • 3.3.2.4 Type C Timer/Counters
3.4 Summary
  • 3.4.1 Endnotes

4. Learning to be a Good Communicator

4.1 Types of Communications
  • 4.1.1 Defining Characteristics of a Communication Channel
  • 4.1.2 Channel Data Throughput
  • 4.1.3 Point-to-Point vs. Multinode Networks
  • 4.1.4 Physical Properties of the Data Link
  • 4.1.5 Asynchronous vs. Synchronous Data Transfer
  • 4.1.6 Hardware Error Detection
4.2 Communication Options Available on the dsPIC30F 4.2.1 The Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) Port 4.2.2 The Universal Asynchronous Receiver-Transmitter (UART)
  • 4.2.2.1 A Basic UART Interface Framework
4.2.3 The Controller Area Network (CAN)
  • 4.2.3.1 Basic CAN Architecture
  • 4.2.3.2 CAN Data Formats
  • 4.2.3.3 Bus Arbitration
  • 4.2.3.4 Acceptance Filters
  • 4.2.3.5 Basic CAN Interface Framework
4.3 High-Level Protocols
  • 4.3.1 General Message Protocol
  • 4.3.2 Command-Specific Protocols
4.4 Summary
  • 4.4.1 Endnotes

5. A Basic Toolkit for the dsPIC DSC

  • 5.1 The Application Test Bed
5.2 Overview of the Firmware Framework
  • 5.2.1 Application Data Flow
5.2.2 System Task Flow
  • 5.2.2.1 Initializing the Software Environment
  • 5.2.2.2 dsPIC Interrupt Configuration
  • 5.3 Implementation of the Framework Modules
5.4 Summary
  • 5.4.1 Endnotes

6. Sensor Application—Temperature Sensor

6.1 Types of Temperature Sensors
  • 6.1.1 Thermocouples
  • 6.1.2 Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs)
  • 6.1.3 Thermistors
  • 6.1.4 Silicon Sensors
  • 6.1.5 Infrared Sensors
6.2 Key Aspects of Temperature Measurement
  • 6.2.1 Range of Measurement
  • 6.2.2 Resolution of Measurement
  • 6.2.3 Accuracy of Measurement
6.2.4 Challenges 6.2.4.1 Signal Characteristics
  • 6.2.4.1.1 Signal Level
  • 6.2.4.1.2 Frequency Content
  • 6.2.4.2 Cold-Junction Compensation
  • 6.2.4.3 Linearization
  • 6.2.4.4 Calibration
6.2.4.5 Sources of Noise
  • 6.2.4.5.1 AC Power
6.2.4.6 Error Conditions
  • 6.2.4.6.1 Open Thermocouple
  • 6.2.4.6.2 Reversed Thermocouple
6.3 Application Design
  • 6.3.1 System Specification
6.3.2 Sensor Signal Conditioning
  • 6.3.2.1 Differential Amplifier
  • 6.3.2.2 Antialiasing Filter
  • 6.3.2.3 Digital Filtering Analysis
  • 6.3.2.4 Data Analysis Algorithms
  • 6.3.2.5 Communication Protocol
6.4 Hardware Implementation
  • 6.4.1 Analog Amplifier and Antialiasing Filter
  • 6.4.2 Cold-Junction Compensation
  • 6.4.3 Signal Isolation
6.5 Firmware Implementation
  • 6.5.1 Signal Sampling
  • 6.5.2 Digital Filter Implementation
  • 6.5.3 Data Analysis Implementation
  • 6.5.4 Error-Handling Implementation
  • 6.5.5 Communication Protocol Implementation
6.6 Summary
  • 6.6.1 Endnotes

7. Sensor Application—Pressure and Load Sensors

7.1 Types of Load and Pressure Sensors
  • 7.1.1 Strain Gages
  • 7.1.2 Piezoelectric Sensors
7.2 Key Aspects of Load Measurement
  • 7.2.1 Range of Measurement
  • 7.2.2 Resolution of Measurement
  • 7.2.3 Accuracy of Measurement
7.2.4 Challenges
  • 7.2.4.1 Signal Characteristics
  • 7.2.4.2 Thermal Compensation
  • 7.2.4.3 Linearization
  • 7.2.4.4 Calibration
  • 7.2.4.5 Sources of Noise
  • 7.2.4.6 Error Conditions
7.3 Application Design
  • 7.3.1 System Specification
  • 7.3.2 Sensor Signal Conditioning
  • 7.3.3 Digital Filter Analysis
  • 7.3.4 Data Analysis Algorithms
7.4 Firmware Implementation
  • 7.4.1 Signal Sampling
  • 7.4.2 Digital Filter Implementation
  • 7.4.3 Data Analysis Implementation
  • 7.4.4 Error-Handling Implementation
7.5 Summary
  • 7.5.1 Endnotes

8. Sensor Application—Flow Sensors

8.1 Types of Flow Sensors
  • 8.1.1 Turbine Sensors
  • 8.1.2 Gravimetric Sensors
8.2 Key Aspects of Flow Measurement
  • 8.2.1 Range of Measurement
  • 8.2.2 Resolution of Measurement
  • 8.2.3 Accuracy of Measurement
8.2.4 Challenges of Flow Measurement
  • 8.2.4.1 Signal Characteristics
  • 8.2.4.2 Material Density Compensation
  • 8.2.4.3 Linearization
  • 8.2.4.4 Calibration
  • 8.2.4.5 Sources of Noise
  • 8.2.4.6 Error Conditions
8.3 Application Design
  • 8.3.1 System Specification
  • 8.3.2 Sensor Signal Conditioning
  • 8.3.3 Digital Filtering Analysis
  • 8.3.4 Data Analysis Algorithms
  • 8.3.5 Communication Protocol
8.4 Hardware Implementation
  • 8.4.1 Turbine Sensor Interface Circuitry
8.5 Firmware Implementation 8.5.1 Data-Acquisition Module
  • 8.5.1.1 Sensor Signal Level Monitor
  • 8.5.1.2 Blade Transition Counter
8.5.2 Data Filtering Module
  • 8.5.2.1 Sensor Signal Level Filtering
8.5.3 Data-Analysis Module
  • 8.5.3.1 Flow-Rate Analysis
  • 8.5.3.2 Signal-Level Analysis
  • 8.5.4 Communication-Protocol Module
8.6 Summary
  • 8.6.1 Endnotes

9. Where are We Headed?

9.1 Technology Trends
  • 9.1.1 Sensing-Element Trends
9.1.2 Computational Element Trends
  • 9.1.2.1 Dramatically Lower Power Consumption
  • 9.1.2.2 Continual Size Reduction
9.1.3 Communication Trends
  • 9.1.3.1 The Pervasive Internet
  • 9.1.3.2 Wireless Communications
  • 9.1.3.3 Security
  • 9.1.3.4 Ad Hoc Networking
9.2 Economic Trends
  • 9.2.1 Demographics of an Aging Population
9.2.2 Increasing Globalization of Operations
  • 9.2.2.1 New Business Opportunities
9.3 Summary
  • 9.3.1 Endnotes

Appendix A: Software on the Included CD-ROM

  • A.1 On-Disk Website of Resources
  • A.2 Source Code for the Three Applications

Appendix B: Initialization of the dsPIC DSC and the System Start-up Code

  • Endnotes

Appendix C: Buffered Interrupt-Driven Serial I/O

  • C.1 Pseudo-Code for the Framework
  • C.2 System Initialization
  • C.3 Reading Data From the Interface
  • C.4 Writing Data to the Interface
  • Index

ISBN-10: 0750677554
ISBN-13: 978-0750677554


This product was added to our catalog on Tuesday 08 January, 2008.

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